Thursday, August 12, 2010

Salsa for Everyone

     I can't believe I haven't written about salsa, wow!  Well, growing up we had salsa as a condiment, not for dipping or snacking on.  There are so many preparations, types and uses for salsa.  There is no fast way (in my opinion) to make a really good salsa.  Also, there are so many different consistencies that you can get out of your salsa and flavors too.  I'll break this up into the three blogs with the three salsas I most commonly prepare, you will see that they are almost identical in prep but incredibly unique in taste and uses.

Hot or Mild Tomato and Jalapeño Salsa
Yield 18-32oz

The "Hot" version is hotter than the Fire Sauce at Taco Bell and the mild is about as mild or even more mild than the Taco Bell Mild Sauce.

To make Hot salsa you'll need:
10 Jalapeños
5 large tomatoes
half a white or yellow onion
1 garlic glove
salt


To make Mild salsa you'll need :
2 Jalapeños
 4-6 large tomatoes (depending on how mild you want it)
half a white or yellow onion
1 garlic glove
salt

     Place all the these items on a cast iron skillet or a heavy bottom pan over low heat.  Let everything char all over until the skin is falling off the tomatoes and the jalapeños are blackened, rotating them all often.  You may have to take the onion and garlic off the heat sooner than the other items.  Once the peppers are blackened place them in a plastic zip lock bag or in a bowl covered with a damp kitchen towel. 

     Place the onion and garlic in a food processor or blender.  For the tomatoes, once they've cooled, remove the skin as best you can and remove the core also before placing ONE TOMATO in the blender.  After the jalapeños have cooled down use a paper towel to help you remove the blackened skin.  Then remove the stem, slice them down the middle and remove the seeds and inner ribs.  Add ALL the jalapeños to the processor or blender, add a pinch of salt and buzz that baby until it is perfectly smooth.  This process is so that the jalapeños are completely pureed and large chunks of onion or garlic are left. 

     Next add your remaining tomatoes and blend until the mixture comes to a consistency of your liking.  I like a little texture but not too much.  I add a little extra salt because as time passes the salt gets neutralized by the acidic tomatoes.  Sergio like to eat this particular salsa with tortilla chips, but we also use it in chicken/pork tacos, for breakfast on our eggs, on steak, fish, in a soup or with beans and a tortilla.  We use about 28oz of salsa every two weeks during the summer when tomatoes are a better price.  Good luck and send me an e-mail or call me up if you have questions or problems.

Enjoy!

3 comments:

  1. yay omg thanks noni. you have no idea how many times i've forgotten a step (like de-seed) or to brown my garlic clove. thanks nono! love you!!!

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  2. btw, why do you only put one tomato at first? is that why mine comes out with huge chunks of jalepeno and it's still watery?

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  3. That's right sister. Ma also tastes it at this point (but it can be really HOT) and adds only as many tomatoes as she feels is necessary.

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